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Cameron is a Tory scumbag who has never wanted for anything in his privileged life. If he or any any of his family fall ill he can afford to pay for them to go to a private hospital. If working class people fall ill, all they have is the NHS and with this government's savage cuts on our basic services many people will be dead before they even get on the waiting list. The audacity of the man giving £Billions to foreign countries, many of which have despotic rulers who just squander the money on more weapons and palaces for themselves and their families. In the case of Pakistan, the £750 million given recently to that country was unbelievable, given that the country is a nuclear power and has a massive army, five times the size of the British Army. Then he starts another war in Libya whilst continuing that pointless war in Afghanistan. Both costing this country £Billions.

Anyway, Cameron should know that Band Aid actually created more misery than there was before its appeal as in the 25 years since the campaign, Ethiopia's population has doubled and now there are twice as many people close to starvation!

The British are the most generous people in Europe

'I saw Live Aid and I'm sticking to my promise':

How Cameron justifies the billions Britain spends abroad

  • PM says failing to back Arab Spring will help extremists
  • Summit dominated by talks on Middle East turmoil
  • Sarkozy plans joint visit to Benghazi with Cameron
  • Obama vows to 'finish the job' in Libya
Deauville: David Cameron, the Prime Minister, used the G8 platform to dismiss criticism of foreign aid

Deauville: David Cameron, the Prime Minister, used the G8 platform to dismiss criticism of foreign aid

David Cameron today dismissed criticism over rises in aid spending while Britain endures austerity measures.

The Prime Minister insisted he was 'proud' that the UK would not 'balance its books on the back of the poorest'.

And he warned that failing to support countries at the forefront of the Arab Spring would give 'oxygen' to extremists.

At a press conference at the end of the G8 summit in France, Mr Cameron also made clear his frustration that other wealthy nations were not fulfilling pledges on aid.

'Britain will keep its promises and I was tough in urging my counterparts to do the same,' he said. 'The reality is that as a whole the G8 has not.'

He added: 'Of course it is a tough argument to make when we are making tough choices at home, but I think it's the right thing.'

He was speaking after Britain was branded the ‘soft touch’ of the international community by one of his own MPs.

Philip Davies criticised Mr Cameron after it emerged the British bill for foreign aid will be £8.7billion in 2011-2012, rising to more than £12billion in 2014.

Speaking in Deauville earlier today, Mr Cameron said he remembered watching Band Aid and Live Aid on television, and the impact those events had.

Referring to the G8 pledge of spending 0.7% of GDP on aid by 2015, Mr Cameron said: 'These things matter and if we are going to try to get across to the poorest people in the world that we care... then we have got to keep our promises.'

Mr Cameron said: 'The big test for the G8 was whether we could respond to the momentous events that we have seen in North Africa and the Middle East. I would argue that we have responded.'

He went on: 'There are those that argue that these North African countries, they are not the poorest in the world, and we should concentrate either on our own affairs, or indeed elsewhere.

David Cameron says goodbye to US President Barack Obama and acting Director General of the IMF John Lipsky

David Cameron says goodbye to US President Barack Obama and acting Director General of the IMF John Lipsky

High level negotiations: Prime Minister David Cameron, left, speaks with U.S. President Barack Obama. The Arab uprisings have dominated the summit

High level negotiations: Prime Minister David Cameron, left, speaks with U.S. President Barack Obama. The Arab uprisings have dominated the summit

'I reject that approach. We should be in no doubt that if we get this wrong, if we fail to support these countries, we risk giving oxygen to the extremists who prey on the frustrations and aspirations of young people.

'You would see, I believe, if we fail, more terrorism, more immigration and more instability coming from Europe's southern border.'

The two-day summit in Deauville, France, was dominated by the response to the Arab Spring and the situation in Libya.

French president Nicolas Sarkozy even announced plans for a joint visit to the country with Mr Cameron.

Mr Cameron previously warned that failing to help countries implementing democratic reforms could create 'poisonous extremism' and a wave of immigration.

He has announced that the UK is allocating £110million over four years to strengthen justice systems, cut corruption, encourage political parties, and broaden economic opportunities.

Some £70million will come from the Department for International Development, which is enjoying budget rises while the rest of Whitehall makes swingeing cuts.

The Foreign Office will provide another £40million.

Aides claimed that, relative to the UK's economy, the commitment was in line with a one billion-dollar debt relief package unveiled by America.

Left to right: President of the European Commission Jose Maneul Barroso, French president Nicolas Sarkozy, U.S. President Barack Obama and Japanese prime minister Naoto Kan walk to lunch

Left to right: President of the European Commission Jose Maneul Barroso, French president Nicolas Sarkozy,
U.S. President Barack Obama and Japanese prime minister Naoto Kan walk to lunch

CAMERON GETS BEHIND LAGARDE BID FOR IMF JOB

French finance minister Christine Lagarde's candidacy for the top job at the IMF has been backed by David Cameron

David Cameron has backed Christine Lagarde's bid to be the next head of the International Monetary Fund.

The Prime Minister said there was strong support at the G8 for the French finance minister's candidacy. and he believed there was a 'good case' for the role staying in European hands.

Ms Lagarde, pictured, is the overwhelming favourite in the race to succeed countryman Dominique Strauss-Kahn, who quit to fight charges of attempted rape in New York.

Some in the developing world, however, want to break with tradition and see a non-European installed in the post - reflecting the growing importance of the emerging economies.

The Prime Minister said he did not think the time was right for such a change, given the ongoing turmoil in many European economies.

'We strongly support her and we think there is a good case for maintaining European leadership at this difficult time,' he said.

Ms Lagarde earlier told BBC Radio 4's Today: 'I honestly think that the nationality, the origin, is something that doesn't really matter at the end of the day.

'What matters is the skills, the expertise, the experience, the willingness, the enthusiasm, the leadership, the background. All of that counts.'

Mr Cameron had previously made clear that he did not think the post should go to Gordon Brown, his Labour predecessor.

After the prime ministers of Egypt and Tunisia briefed G8 leaders this morning, the final declaration from the summit included a suggestion that multilateral development banks could provide the nations with more than $20billion over the next two years.

G8 countries 'are already in a position to mobilise substantial bilateral support to scale-up this effort', it said.

Despite tensions with Russia over the Nato military campaign in Libya, the document delivered a strong statement that Muammar Gaddafi 'has no future in a free, democratic Libya', adding: 'He must go.'

During the press conference, French president Nicolas Sarkozy reiterated his plans to visit the eastern Libyan rebel stronghold of Benghazi, preferably in a joint mission with Mr Cameron.

Mr Sarkozy, who along with Mr Cameron has been at the forefront of the West's military campaign in Libya, said he hoped it could be a proper working visit, although no date had yet been set.

'We will go, Alain Juppe and I, to Benghazi when the time is right, but we want it to be a working visit,' Mr Sarkozy said, referring to his foreign minister.

'It should be a Franco-British initiative, it would be awkward to do it separately. It's still on the table but for various reasons we haven't fixed the date yet.

Mr Cameron did not say whether he agreed on the idea of a joint trip, replying to journalists who asked him about it by laughing and saying: 'President Sarkozy is always full of good ideas.'

US president Barack Obama also reiterated his determination to 'finish the job' in Libya, and stressed that meant ejecting Gaddafi from power.

Russian president Dmitry Medvedev said Russia's G8 partners had suggested Moscow take a mediation role in Libya, although officials from other delegations at Deauville played down that idea.

And the declaration language on Syria appeared to have been toned down, with Moscow also resisting demands for action over the regime's brutal repression of protests.

Earlier drafts explicitly indicated that a UN Security Council resolution could be sought if the regime did not end human rights violations.

The final version merely stated that the G8 would 'consider further measures'.

The declaration claimed that the nations were 'strongly committed' to meeting pledges on aid levels, and being 'transparent' about how much they were giving.

But Mr Cameron is said to have pointed out in a private session earlier that the UK was the only country firmly on track to meet a target for giving 0.7 per cent of GDP by 2015.


Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1391581/G8-summit-2011-David-Cameron-dismisses-foreign-aid-budget-criticism.html#ixzz1Najx7pt9

© 2011 British People's Party, BM Box 5581, London WC1N 3XX